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Sidewalks

For over 4,000 years sidewalks have been used as a formal pathway to successful travel from one place to another by foot.

More About Sidewalks

Since their early creation, sidewalks have changed in size, shape, materials, and even became regulated by government entities. Today’s sidewalks provide a safe path for everyone to use. But what do you do when your sidewalk becomes unsafe?

Ro-Berg Void Fill 600 x 450
Sidewalk 300 x 500

A couple of options in the past has been to replace damaged and unsafe sidewalks. A very common method is to ignore and hope the city in which the sidewalk resigns in will replace or repair. Or the sidewalk can be lifted and leveled creating safe working sidewalk once again. Sidewalks in the Gulf Coast region has a bad habit of sinking. With help from flooding, tree roots, and the expansive soil sidewalks can move from their original location and elevation.

The price of replacement can depend on the size of the sidewalk, the existing conditions and the market price for steel, fuel, and concrete. If replacement is the chosen method of repair, you can expect your sidewalk to be removed, then a new sidewalk will need to be formed, have reinforcement installed before the new concrete can be poured. This could take a couple days rendering your new structure off limits for use for a couple more days.

A faster and cheaper alternative to replacement is the use of polyurethane foam injections. The foam is injected in areas that need to be lifted and leveled. Because the concrete isn’t the reason it was sinking in the first place the foam provides compaction to the soil under the concrete and lifts the concrete to a usable elevation free of trip hazards. What would take days, now only takes hours. The best part is you can use your sidewalk as intended 15 minutes after the concrete has been lifted.

Save time, money, and your concrete by lifting instead of replacing.

  1. “Definition of SIDEWALK”. www.merriam-webster.com. Merriam-Webster. Retrieved 2020-10-25.
  2. ^“pavement”. www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com. Oxford University Press. Retrieved 2020-10-25.

^ Caves, R. W. (2004). Encyclopedia of the City. Routledge. p. 594. ISBN 9780415252256.